Getting published: A guide from journal writing to academic impact

Terminology of Academic Publishing, Open Access and Impact

 

Altmetrics Non-traditional metrics for scholarly outputs designed to measure research impact other than citation metrics. Examples include views, downloads, bookmarks, shares, social and news media mentions.
Article processing charge A fee charged to the author, or author's institution, to facilitate Gold Open Access.
Bibliometrics Statistical analysis of written publications to determine patterns of authorship, publication and use. Examples include citation impact metrics and the h-index. For a guide to bibliometrics, see the University Research Office intranet site REF@Derby.
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) A string of numbers and/or letters added to digital publications. DOIs are an internationally recognised standard for preserving and referencing online material.
Creative Commons (CC) License A form of public copyright license that enables the free distribution of an otherwise copyrighted work. A CC license is used to give people the right to share, use and build upon an output. For examples of the types of CC license, see the Creative Commons website.
Open Access (Black) An output is published behind a subscription pay-wall with distribution rights belonging to the publisher. The published PDF is made available via a repository and/or research profile site in breach of the terms in the publisher-author agreement.
Open Access (Green) An output is published behind a subscription pay-wall with distribution rights belonging to the publisher. The author accepted manuscript is made available via a repository and/or research profile site and embargoed according to the terms of the publisher-author agreement.
Open Access (Gold) An output is published open access on the publisher website, which the author or author's institution has paid an article processing charge to allow for. The published output is often published with a Creative Commons License stating the re-use and sharing allowances.
Open Access (Platinum) An output is published open access on the publisher website, which the publisher has not charged the author or author's institution for. The published output is often published with a Creative Commons License stating the re-use and sharing allowances. 
Peer-review
(Double blind)
The names of both reviewer and author are anonymised. Pros and cons of Double blind review can be found on the Elsevier website, What is peer review?
Peer-review
(Open review)
The names of both reviewer and author are known to each other. Pros and cons of Open review can be found on the Elsevier website, What is peer review?
Peer-review
(Single blind)
The names of the reviewers are hidden from the author. This is the traditional method of peer-review. Pros and cons of Single blind review can be found on the Elsevier website, What is peer review?
Peer-review 
(Transparent review)
Contributions from the reviewer are made publicly available alongside the published article. Pros and cons of Transparent review can be found on the Elsevier website, What is peer review?