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Psychology: Finding Articles

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PAIN publishes original research on the nature, mechanisms, and treatment of pain and provides a multidisciplinary forum for the dissemination of research in the basic and clinical sciences.

Full text access: 2000-present

Tip

To search for journal articles on a topic, Library Plus is recommended.

To look for a specific journal, use the E-Journals Finder.

 

Finding journal articles

The library subscribes to a large number of electronic journals and journals databases as well as print journals. You may know the journal you need to find an article in but to avoid having to search lots of journals individually,  journal indexes and databases enable you to find articles on a subject or by an author from a wide range of journals. Some contain the full-text of the article, some are indexes only (giving the details of articles published but not the full article itself) and some are a mix of the two.

Library Plus searches across many of our journals and journals indexes and databases and so is a very good starting point.  You can search the specific individual databases if you wish even if they are included in Library Plus. They usually cover specific subject areas. . Relevant journals databases are listed in the Other databases tab and may include both full text and non full text articles

Before you do a journals database search you need to think about which keywords and search terms to use, what sort of information you want to find and how much. You then need to evaluate your results and be prepared to alter your search accordingly. You also need to keep a record of the results you have found useful so that you can refer back to them. See Search tips and strategies for more information.

If you are looking for a specific journal then all our e-journals are listed and available in the E-Journals Finder.

If we don't have access to a journal you will often be able to see an abstract, or summary, of the journal article. This should help you decide how important it is to you. We are able to obtain journal articles for you using the inter library loan Service if you are at Stage 5 or beyond.Access to the abstracts for articles enables you to see the breadth of academic and professional literature available in your subject area even if we do not have a subscription and so may for example be useful for independent studies projects.

We have many more e-journals than print ones, but we do have some journals as print only and we have longer backruns of some print titles.

E-Journals Finder

If you already have a reference to an article or are looking for a specific electronic journal, use the E-Journals Finder. If you are looking for journal articles on a topic the best starting point is Library Plus.

Type the title of the journal, not the article title, into the search box of the E-Journals Finder.

This will search our collection of electronic journals for all titles which include your search terms, and give you information about which database the journal is hosted on. You may find that some journals are hosted on multiple different databases, often with different years of coverage.

The list of results will give you information about the availability of the journal. You may find that some journals are available through several different providers with different years of coverage as below.

The example below shows we have the British Journal of  Social Psychology as an e-journal through the publisher Wiley from 1962. You may find that some journals are available through several different providers with different years. To see the journal click on one of the links under the journal title, which in this case will be the Wiley link . You will then need to navigate to the year, and then volume and issue number.You can also search the journal using the search box.

 

Using Library Plus to search for specific journal articles

You can find specific journal articles using Advanced Search in Library Plus. But remember that Library Plus does not include absolutely all of our e-journals, though it does include many.

To search for a specific journal article in Advanced Search,change "Select a Field" by  the search box e.g.

  • to "AU Author" and type in the author's surname
  • and/or to "Ti Title" and type in some words from the title of an article
  • and/or to "SO Journal Title/ Source" and type in the journal name

 

 

 

 

Library Plus  is a very good starting point for searching journal articles on a topic.

Library Plus includes:

  • Most of our e-journal subscriptions
  • Journals in many of our full-text databases e.g. SPORTDiscus Full Text, Science Direct, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Expanded Academic ASAP, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Medical Databases, Science Full Text Select
  • Details of journal articles indexed in other Library databases e.g. Web of Science.

Library Plus does not include:

  • Some subject specific databases e.g. PubMed
  • the Library's main newspaper database, Infrotrac Newsstand

Basic Search automatically restricts your search to journal articles we have full access to.  In Advanced Search tick the Full Text box to restrict your search to journal articles we have full access to. However you may want to see what has been published whether or not we have full access, for example if you are doing research for Independent Studies or a Masters thesis.

Advanced Search gives you more options. For example as well as limiting  the search to Full Text, you can combine more search terms, limit by date, by type of publication, geographic region or by author or title words etc.

To view the full text of an article, click on Get Full Text.    

The article should either directly or may require several clicks to reach the journal article. In some cases the link may be to the journal web site rather than direct to the journal article and you will then need to search the journal for the article. It is possible that in some cases the links may not work as well as we would like.

 

Using Library Plus to search for specific journal articles

To search for a specific journal article in Advanced Search,change "Select a Field" by  the search box e.g.

  • to "AU Author" and type in the author's surname
  • and/or to "Ti Title" and type in some words from the title of an article
  • and/or to "SO Journal Title/ Source" and type in the journal name

 

You can save searches and search results by creating a personal account in Library Plus and saving results into folders.  For a more detailed guide on using Library Plus Click here

PsycINFO (also included in Library Plus)

The PsycINFO database is the American Psychological Association’s (APA) resource for abstracts of scholarly journal articles, book chapters, books, and dissertations,and is the largest resource devoted to peer-reviewed literature in psychology, behavioural science and mental health. Journal coverage, which spans from the 1800s to the present, includes international material selected from around 2,500 periodicals in dozens of languages.

PsycINFO (also included in Library Plus)

The PsycINFO database is the American Psychological Association’s (APA) resource for abstracts of scholarly journal articles, book chapters, books, and dissertations,and is the largest resource devoted to peer-reviewed literature in psychology, behavioural science and mental health. Journal coverage, which spans from the 1800s to the present, includes international material selected from around 2,500 periodicals in dozens of languages.
 
PsycArticles (also included in Library Plus)
PsycARTICLES contains the complete journal articles from  nearly 80 journals published by the American Psychological Association (APA), its imprint the Educational Publishing Foundation (EPF), and from allied organizations including the Canadian Psychological Association and the Hogrefe Publishing Group. It includes all journal articles, book reviews, letters to the editor, and errata from each journal. Coverage spans 1894 to the present and nearly all APA journals go back to Volume 1.
 
Web of Science (also included in Library Plus)
Web of Science (within Web of Knowledge) includes the Science Citation Index (1970-), the Social Science Citation Index and Conference Proceedings Citation Index (1990-), which are worldwide indexes to journal articles and conference proceedings. There are no full-text journal articles, but each article displayed has a link 'Check our e-journals A-Z'  to see  if we subscribe to the journal article. One powerful feature is that it informs you which journal articles have subsequently cited a particular article.
 

Other databases useful for Psychology include: 

British Psychological Society Proceedings

PubMed (not included in Library Plus)
A searchable collection of medical, biomedical and life science journals from the U.S. National Library of Medicine.  It contains  a large number of freely accessible titles, though the most recent issues of journals may not be available. This is a useful journals database for physiology & health related topics. Some of the journal articles may be available in Library Plus, though Library Plus does not actually search Pubmed itself.

Science Direct (also included in Library Plus)
The journals and book database of Elsevier publishing. Note that we generally have full journal access form the late 1990s. We do not have online access to books.

EBSCO Medical Databases (also included in Library Plus)
Links to all of the health databases subscribed to through EBSCO: AMED, CINAHL Plus, Medline, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, but included in Library Plus

 

Browsing through the current issues of print journals is useful to keep up to date with the latest research and events in your subject area. The current issues of our print journals in the  Kedleston Road Library are on the upper ground floor. The back copies are held in the 2 journals stacks on the lower ground floor.

You can use the Library catalogue to find out which print journals we subscribe to. You can only search for print journals in the Library catalogue by journal title (e.g. Journal of Animal Ecology) not individual journal articles. 

We try to have an e-version of the print journals we subscribe to but we do not have e-versions of all of our print journals. We have many more e-journals than print journals but we do hold some print titles which go further back in time than the e-journal.

The Library catalogue will give you details of how far back the subscription goes and where the journal is located (see example below).

 

This example tells you that we have print copies of the British Journal of Psychology at Kedleston Road from 1943-1947 and then from 1967 to the present day. At Kedleston Road library all back issues are kept in the Stacks in the Flexible Learning Zone on the lower ground floor and are arranged alphabetically by title.

Looking through back issues of print journals is very time consuming and you can avoid having to do this. However there may be some specific journals which you want to browse for various reasons, for example if it is a title you know will contain interesting and relevant articles, or if is not indexed in our databases.

If you are looking for journal articles on a topic generally then see the "Journal Databases" tab above to help you search across a wide range of journals.

Many print journals are indexed in our databases or you may be able to search the journal's website first. A print journal may have an annual index and this may save you having to look through several years of back issues looking for articles on your area of interest. Some print journals had a cumulative index covering several years.

If you have checked the E-journals A-Z and the journal you need is not available from the University of Derby collection it may be worth trying Google Scholar. Google Scholar is a free search engine that searches across a range of academic material including peer-reviewed papers, theses, books, preprints, abstracts and technical reports. If the article has been cited by others, a 'cited by' link will be part of the record. Clicking on that link will take you to the list of articles that cited the item in question.

 

If we do not have a particular journal article you want (either print or electronic) we can usually obtain it for you using our inter library loans service from the British Library Document Supply Centre.  Before putting in a request please check that we do not hold an electronic or print copy. Inter library loans are available to students from Stage 2 onwards. Undergraduate students are entitled to 20 requests at a charge of £2.00 per item. Post- graduate students are allowed 20 free of charge and then a further 20 at £2.00 per item.

For more information about inter-library loans and how to request them, go to the inter-library loan guide.

Google Scholar searches across a range of academic material including peer-reviewed papers, theses, books, preprints, abstracts and technical reports. If the article has been cited by others, a 'cited by' link may be part of the record. Clicking on that link will take you to the list of articles that have cited the article or book.

Google Scholar is very useful, but it is important to bear in mind:

  • Google Scholar does not have access to full journal articles unless they have been made freely available
  • Not all material will necessarily be peer-reviewed. There is no editorial process within Google Scholar, so you need to be careful what you rely upon.
  • Some articles may not appear as they do in the final published work. Preprints and drafts are all indexed by Google Scholar as well as open-access final articles.

You can customise Google Scholar to give full access to many of the University of Derby's own e-resources. Go to the Google Scholar homepage and click on the 3 horizontal bars in the top left. Then click on "Settings", then "Library links". Type in "Derby" and tick the boxes which should appear: "University of Derby Check E-journals Finder" and "University of Derby ProQuest Full Text". Click on Save. When you subsequently do searches on Google Scholar you will see "Check E-Journals Finder" next to some of the results which denotes we should have full access through our subscriptions. You should then be able to see the full journal article. So if you are using Google Scholar like this, you are accessing the journal articles through the Library's subscriptions. This needs to done for each device you are using. Google Scholar cannot distinguish which dates we have access to though.

Google Scholar has an Advanced Search which is found by clicking on the 3 horizontal bars in the top left.

Infotrac Newsstand  is a searchable database which contains the full text (not images) of  UK & foreign newspapers  including:

National newspapers e.g. Daily Telegraph 2000-, Financial Times 1999-, Guardian 1990-, Observer 1993-, Sunday Times 1985-, Times 1985-

Local & regional newspapers e.g. Belper News 2007-, Buxton Advertiser 2002-, Derby Telegraph 2013-, Derbyshire Times 2002-, Ilkeston Advertiser 2007-, Matlock Mercury 2002-, Nottingham Evening Post 2012-

To search for newspapers only, select Publication Search, then specify Format - Newspapers. You can select United Kingdom under Country.

 

Times Digital Archive contains the complete digital editions of The Times newspaper from 1785 - 1985, searchable by keyword.

Think about keywords & what information you need

Think about which keywords or phrases you may need to use to describe the subjects and break the search down into different parts. Don't just type in the title of an essay. List alternatives to these keywords that you could also use, including different spellings. Don’t use words like: the, from, of etc.

"Boolean operators" (AND, OR, NOT) and truncation (*) allow you to combine terms and search for words with alternative endings. 

Or searches for either word and broadens the search. e.g. oil or petroleum or gas will search for any of these words.

And means both words need to be present and narrows a search to be more specific.  e.g. oil and pollution

"...." searches a phrase e.g. "north sea"

* You may often be able to truncate a word using *  e.g. environment* searches for environment, environmental, environmentally etc.

Then think about e.g.:  

  • If you need recent publications or whether the date matters.
  • What sort of publication you want to search for e.g. academic journal articles, magazine articles etc.
  • How much information you require.
  • If you want to search wider than what we have immediately available. e.g. if you are doing an Independent Studies project and we do not have some key articles, you could think about using our Inter Library Loan service.

Evaluate your results

Evaluate your search results to see if you need more, fewer or different results. It may be necessary to make your search more specific or more general, combine keywords in different ways or use alternative keywords. You can often make your search more specific by using the ‘advanced search’ options in a database to search by author, publication date, journal title, etc. You can choose whether you want to search for the words in just the title of the article (but be careful with this as you may miss some useful journal articles). Library Plus, for example,  allows you to specify academic or peer reviewed journals, publisher or geographic location.

Saving articles and search results

Many databases allow you to save articles in a folder. To do this in Library Plus, you  need to create a personal account. Click here for further information about searching and saving in Library Plus. 

Opening an article as a PDF is the best way to save it and you will also have the page numbers on the article which you will need if you use a direct quotation. You can usually save journal articles to your network drive or to a memory stick.You may need to return to the journal articles you have found so you will need some record of the article details and how you found them.

A number of Bibliographic or Referencing packages are also available. See the Referencing Software guide for more information.